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16 May 2016

The Fitzwilliam Museum's exhibition, Death on the Nile: Understanding the afterlife of ancient Egypt, has been a resounding success. As it nears its closing date, some of our Tour Directors give their feedback on their visit in March 2016.

The Fitzwilliam Museum's exhibition, Death on the Nile: Understanding the afterlife of ancient Egypt, has been a resounding success. As it nears its closing date, some of our Tour Directors give their feedback on their visit in March 2016.

Andrew Wilson reports "I was struck by how scientific archaeology has become in the years since I first studied the subject back in the early 1970s...The exhibition allowed these people from the past to speak to us today, and give us fresh insights into how they lived, died and imagined the afterlife, and made me want to return to the Nile..."

      For the Tour Directors' full responses read our Death on the Nile article.

Formerly a museums curator herself, Evelyn Silber praises the way the exhibition is "a great example of how university museums push the boundaries of research but make it very accessible and fascinating to the public.... they were able to tell an ostensibly familiar story in an entirely original way..."

Christopher Bourne was fascinated by the fact "that the ancient Egyptians were using the same pigments (malachite, lapis lazuli, ochre, etc) to create paint for their coffins that the Old Masters also used centuries later...."

While Robert Hulse was most moved by "Henenu's simple wooden coffin in the Fitzwilliam Museum, crafted out of the wrong shaped timber, broken and held together with hide stitches... Henenu was an administrator, not a Pharoah, and Death on the Nile reminds us that it is not only the super rich who die and prepare for death...."

Niamh Whitfield "was particularly interested in the revelations about the ‘make-do and mend’ approach of the coffin maker in ancient Egypt. Who would have thought that these splendid coffins had been assembled from so many bits and pieces? It certainly brought home just how rare, and no doubt valuable, wood was in this environment..."

Imogen Corrigan sums up the experience well "... When I went into the museum I was interested to learn about something unknown to me. I left knowing that I would like to know more."

     To read more reflections on the Fitzwilliam's Death on the Nile exhibition visit our Death on the Nile review article

 
 
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